A post from the past ……..


First of all, a big big sorry to all our followers for not writing new stories in the past 11!!!months. 

The main reason for this was that a big part of the past 11 months we were not really traveling with Izzie. 
We were on a tight travel schedule and didn’t have that much time to write stories. 

Let us try and pick up where we left 🙂
South Africa!!

After our gorgeous time in Namibie we drove towards Cape Town. 
We’ve been to CT before but that was a short visit a while ago (2007) and it involved a lot of bad weather. 
This time we were more lucky with the weather. Driving in to CT we already saw more of table mountain than the last time we were here. 
Our time in Cape town was mostly spent eating good food, drinking fantastic coffee at our favorite coffee place ‘bean there’, watching the first world cup matches and catching up with our friend/surf legend Gary. 
The only touristy thing that we did, last time we were here it was fully booked, was Robben Island, “home” of hundreds of prisoners during the apartheid, including Mandela. 

After 10 lovely days in Cape Town it was time to hit the road again. 
Our journey through South Africa was so relaxing, going from one wine estate to another, Bun-jee jumping, visiting friends, sample good food, going to national parks, wild camping all the time, …….     We had the feeling we never wanted to leave again!!

In Durban we met up with our friend Carla a girl we met in Central America. Her dad was so kind to let us park our home in front of his office. Thank you again Allison and John!! We watched our red devils soccer team win a few matches and decide to stay until they lost which was the next match against Argentina. 
No more belgians in the world cup so time to move on. From Carla’s place we drove towards drakensberg. 
The scenery was once more absolutely beautiful. After drakensberg we got in contact again with Matt and Tracy from T2T who live in Johannesburg and already invited us to their house whenever we happened to be in jozi one day. 
We were so curious about their stories since the last thing we read on their blog was that Matt was struggling with the worst case of malaria while being trapped on a barge in the DRC and was waiting to be rescued!!
Meeting Matt and Tracy was probably the best thing that happened to us at this stage of our travels, after all it was time to think about what to do next.

Our original plan was to do a full loop of africa and then continue through the middle east. In west africa boko haram already interfered with that plan, this time it was IS in Iraq. 
So we decided to go to South America instead!! Until we received quotes to ship Izzie!! 

We still went to South America but just the two of us. 
Thanks to Matt and Tracy who made us an offer we couldn’t refuse. Park Izzie on their driveway, in front of their gorgeous house, for five months while we went on a vacation!!!

But before we did all this, we went on a small trip with Izzie to Swaziland and the more touristy part of South Africa. We did some small national parks and St Lucia, a lovely little town where hippos wonder the streets at night. After this mini trip of about two weeks we parked Izzie back on our friends driveway and started an overland trip from Jo’burg to Dar Es Salaam including Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Botswana and Zimbabwe. Soon we realized we made a mistake to choose an african tour company instead of one of the reliable ones that we traveled with before like dragoman or oasis. 
We had a good time and were glad we saw the beauty of all of the above but were kinda ready to explore a new continent.  So of we were to South America!!

Our first stop was Buenos Aires. 
Only for three days, later we would return here again with our Tucan trip. 
Same for Santiago. Had three days to stroll around the city and get over the jet lag. 
Next stop was Easter Island. One of the things that was definitely in our top 10 of ‘places in the world we really really wanna visit’
It was totally worth the 6 hours flight out there!!! It is a very expensive destination but one of the most beautiful we’ve ever visited in our lives. 

We spent four days exploring the island with our little rental 4×4, bit different than driving Izzie 🙂

After Easter Island we returned to Santiago where we rented a studio for 3 days to chilax before our ten weeks overland trip starting in La Paz. 

The trip through patagonia made us realize that we made the right choice not to ship Izzie to South America. Although the area is beautiful, with glaciers and nature we’ve never seen in our lives before, restaurants and cafes to go to (something we sometimes miss in Africa) we didn’t feel the connection like we have with the black continent. 

Before we decided to give up our lives and go drive around the world it was always our plan to go work for an overland company after our trip. 
So in South America we took our chances and got in contact with Oasis Overland. 
To our surprise they offered us a job in africa as driver/tourleader. 
We were so excited by this news that the first weeks we kinda forgot that we still had a big problem to solve: Izzie!!
What are we going to do with Izzie????!!!!!
She was for sale in South Africa and we received a lot of good offers but no one could buy her because a) she’s a left hand drive and b) she’s to old!! Two reasons why you can’t get her registered in SA!!

The only thing we can do is drive her back to Belgium, our should I say race. 
Although we were going fast we were still enjoying our travels. 
We saw a part of South Africa that we didn’t see before. Same for Botswana, still one of our favorite african countries. Even driving through Zambia and Tanzania was beautiful and totally different than 5 months earlier when we past these exact same mountains and valleys with ATC (this stands for Africa’s (most) Terrible Company)
This time it was just after the small rainy season and everything was so beautiful and green!!
Day by day we were getting more excited to go work for oasis which gives us the opportunity to see our favorite continent in every season!!
The whole trip (johannesburg-antwerp) took us just over 7 weeks to get back home. The last stretch through Saudi and Israel was really racing because we were on transit visas and catching ferries with no refund so at that stage the only thing on our minds was getting to Ashdod and on that Grimaldi freighter vessel!!
Driving through Israel made us realize that one day we will return here for various reasons like people being so friendly and helpful and to be honest places like Jerusalem, Betlehem and Tel Aviv you just have to visit once in a life time. 

In Belgium we have a lot to do. Getting lots of paperwork organized to start working for Oasis 
Try to sell Izzie. Catch up with family and friends and maybe earn a buck while we are here. 
So if anyone is interested in going on a little adventure of their own or knows someone ……..
Our little house on wheels is still for sale.  

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Photo’s!!!

We’ve been very, very, very late with this but we finally got some pictures up.
Enjoy some shots from western Africa, from Morocco to Angola.

Just hover over photo’s and pick a country…

Vacation…finally!!!

Our Angolan loop was done so it was time to continue our trip in Namibia. In Angola we made the decision to keep on going south.
We wanna enjoy southern africa first before we go back to ‘the real africa’
Although we don’t think it will ever get as real as west africa again!!

The first thing on the list was Etosha national park. Bad timing because it’s just after the rainy season and the chance of seeing good wildlife is virtually none.
We were here 7 years ago in ‘the good season’ and didn’t see rhino, leopard, cheetah or elephant so we weren’t expecting much!!

The first few hours we only saw the boring stuff like oryx, kudu, wildebeest,….nothing exiting.
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Spotted a few elephants far far away and started to realize that it truly wasn’t the best time to see wildlife.
We had to be at the campsite before sunset so slowly started moving towards Halali. That’s when our luck changed. First some giraffe, then five lions, we even spotted a jackal and mentioned to each other that if we saw a rhino and some elephant the next day we would be pleased with what had seen in Etosha. The word rhino was not even fully pronounced or this huge beast walks right in front of Izzie!!!

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We watched it for a while but had to keep moving towards the campsite. Sun was getting pretty low. We drove two minutes and bam two cheetahs, man we are on a roll but again, damn sunsetting!!

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Ok,now we really have to get going but not without spotting some (6) elephants on our last stretch to Halali.

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The next morning we left early to be able to drive through the park all the way to the newly opened west gate. This is only 70 k’s from Oppi Koppi where we could do some laundry and relax for a few days.

We drove back to Swakopmund to pick up some stuff for Izzie. We had just parked Izzie when we received a mail from Alfred and Astrid, a Swiss couple, traveling the world for the last 30 years or so. They also shipped their car from Tema to Walvis Bay!!
It was good to hear that more experienced travellers than us also got fed up with west africa. Actually, so far we haven’t met anyone that really enjoyed the whole way down.

After Swakopmund it was time to explore Namibia’s capitol Windhoek.
Windhoek is a rather small capital with a few nice landmarks and some nice restaurants and cafes.
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From Windhoek we went south to sossusvlei and sesriem canyon.
Still one of our favorite places in Namibia. On our way there we crossed the Tropic of Capricorn where we just had to stop for a quick photo

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Sesriem canyon was something we missed the last time we were here so we really wanted to see it. It is a small canyon that you explore on foot but it’s very lovely.

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Time to hit the dunes!!

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The next day we drove towards Luderitz. We camped near Kolmanskop, a ghost town, that we wanted to visit the next morning. It was on that next day that we figured out that wild camping in that area is actually prohibited because you are in the diamond district.

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Both Luderitz and Kolmanskop were worth the drive west.Luderitz is situated on a peninsula with a lovely drive. The village itself is an old German bastion with it’s typical architecture.

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Driving in and out of Luderiz you cross the desert and the power of nature is clearly visible.

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Next and final stop in Namibia: Fish River Canyon second largest canyon in the world and a very windy inspiring place. For the adventures people out there, you can walk the canyon for 80 km over five days.

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Out of Africa

We are now in southern africa, finally!!
Walking the streets of Walvis bay and Swakopmund is such a relief after West Africa.

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No one is hassling you on the streets, no one is begging or should I say demanding food.
When you go to a pub or restaurant, yes they do have those here, the food is nice (and fairly priced) and the service is likewise 🙂

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Oke this is not the real africa but for now we are glad we are out of africa for a while!!

In Walvis Bay we got Izzie cleared by John from West to East Coast investments.
A clearing agent we can recommend to everyone shipping to Walvis Bay.

Now it was time to give Izzie a spring clean, which was long overdue, fill up on fuel and stock her up to hit the road again!!

Our first stop was Spitzkoppe!!
We loved it. Beautiful rock formations, arches, the sun setting, a perfect first night camping with Izzie again.

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We enjoyed a nice glass of wine while looking at the stars all snuggled up under a blanket.
Could we be more happier??

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Our next highlight on the list was Skeleton Coast. Now this is a nice drive north to get into beautiful damaraland but if you’re expecting a lot of shipwrecks it’s kinda disappointing.

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Damaraland is together with Kaokaland the most beautiful region of Namibia with still a lot of wildlife in their natural habitat.
It’s also home of twyfelfontein, the organ pipes and other nice ‘rock arts’!!

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From here on we drove to Kamanjab to Oppi Koppi campsite, a recommendation from all overlanders we knew that were in Namibia before. So we couldn’t pass Kamanjab without stopping at Oppi Koppi.
We already mentioned this campsite to some other overlanders that were now behind us so it didn’t come as a surprise that when we arrived we found Kai and Jonas at the bar!!!
We had a lovely time catching up with the boys and got to know Brah and Ronny, two italians on a Aprilla 650, who also came down through West Africa.
Over the next few days we shared some beers, did a braai, had a movie night and enjoyed all the lovely game meat you can have, for a really fair price, at Oppi Koppi.

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Vital, the owner, is a Belgian overlander who lets overlanders, with a foreign license plate, camp for free as long as they desire.
For us it was a good place to give Izzie her now much needed maintenance.
After-all we already driven over 20000 km!!!(more than what most people, that drove the whole section down through the Congo’s, have on the odometer!!)
We ended up spending 6 nights at Kamanjab.
We bought a lot of meat in the meat market and food in the supermarket because the plan now was to go to angola where everything is enormously expensive except diesel.

But first things first, we had to get our hands on the visa!!
From Kamanjab we were of to Oshakati to see if we could get the ‘Almighty’ angola visa!! But not without a stop at Ruancana waterfalls where we had a glimps of Angola and got even more determined to go there so off to Oshakati!!

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We got to the consulate in the afternoon, filled out a very easy application form, went to the bank to make the deposit, gave in the receipt and found out the visa would be ready the next day!! Could it really be that easy???
No hassle about letter of invitation or multiple photos with white background??? In less than 24 hours we got the visa so yes, life can be good!!
The only thing that we needed to do now was stock up the fridge to it’s maximum capacity, fill up the water tank and we were ‘angola’ ready!!
We always wondered if Angola should be considered West or Southern africa?? Let’s go and find out!!

First thing, the border!! We immediately think we are back in West Africa. Fixers that are helping us even if we don’t ask their services, money changers every where,….. One thing we can say is that our first impression of the Angolan people wasn’t that good. Never before at all our border crossings, 14 so far, we encountered such a rude immigration officer.
It took about 3 hours to cross the border which you can also mark as a second point for West Africa.

So of we were….. in Angola yeah!!
The land of cheap fuel and tar roads!! Point for southern africa!! On the other hand food, drinks and accommodation are almost unaffordable!!!

We drove from Lubango to Namibe via the Serra the Leba pass and via Pipas back to Lubango!!

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We soon found out that camping in the wild in Angola was a dream come true after the rest of West Africa, point two being a southern african country!! So our first two nights were wild camping.
The third was spend with one of the friendliest families of Angola we reckon.
We took a dirt road to get to Pipas where we took a rather deep pothole and Sita kinda hurt her back, in a way that she had trouble moving her legs and continuing that day was just impossible!!

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Steven saw what he thought was a guesthouse/camping but soon found out it was a private home, John the owner invited us to stay at his place and because Sita was really in a lot of pain, we took him up on that offer!

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He invited us for lunch and diner, he even said we could stay in one of the rooms!! This was an awesome night for Steven, he could drink beers, shooting pools and playing darts, while Sita was drugged in bed 😦

The next day we slowly drove to Lubango to pay a visit to Tunda Valla. This was after all the number one thing to see in Angola. And boy it was beautiful.

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On our way to Tunda we received a text from ……… Yes you guessed right Gary!! Our surfing friend surfed his way down through the Congo’s and is now also in Angola!!
We had a nice time catching up and having a really overpriced meal together. The only meal and the only night we payed for, the whole time we were in Angola!!

The long loop round Angola took us to places like Binga Falls, Pungo Adongo, Kalandula falls and Miradouro da Luna.

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All very beautiful places with nice people and lovely quiet places to camp.
Although it was still the end of the rainy season we only had rain for about 15 minutes so no complains here.

So … is Angola a western or southern african country???
We can now say for sure: southern!!
When you leave DRC, you close the door of West Africa.

10 things we hate about Izzie

When reading blogs from other overlanders it sounds like they all drive the perfect vehicle.

When we bought Izzie we were also high on cloud nine but got thrown off in a few weeks time when we realised the engine was not working. Our faith had to be restored again and never got close to that ‘cloud nine’ again. Even not on the day we left, about 8 months ago.

Everyone, including us, makes the same mistake.
They all focus on how much you need a 4×4, dif loc, ……..
Because honest, you don’t need all that, not with a truck like Izzie.
Overlanding west africa proves that everytime when they drive from Dakar to Accra and back, through jungle/backroads etc.

The times we had to use our 4×4 we can count on one hand and that’s just because we were to lazy to let the air out of the tires.
Steep rocky patches we just crawl up in first gear, loose sand you can let air out of the tires and if you really really get stuck all the extra things as mentioned above will not work and you will need a third party anyways!!

So is Izzie the perfect overland vehicle?? No, she’s not!!!
Would we wanna trade it for another type of vehicle, also no!!

So here are the 10 things we hate:

1) she’s to big for small jungle paths
(Although we went through them)
2) she’s to high for some low
hanging trees or arches
3) she’s an alcoholic 😉
(Although for her size it’s not to
bad, 26 liters per 100 km)
4) she’s to heavy for some ferries
(Although we survived the 6 ton
ferry to djenne)
5) she takes down parking barriers
(Not really our fault/problem)
6) she’s not the type of vehicle you
just put a side the road to take a
pic
7) if you hate that part of the world
you’re in, you just can’t pack up
and leave (but apart from a bike
you can’t do that with any
overland vehicle)
8) ????????

Can’t think of anything else so maybe it’s not so bad after all 🙂

Maybe I should make a list of 10 things we like about Izzie??

1) it really feels like home
2) when we close the door we feel
save ( I know it’s stupid but it feels
that way)
3) arriving somewhere for the night, it
takes only 3 minutes and we are
‘set up’
4) when it’s cold or rainy outside we
can do everything inside
5) leaving in the morning takes us 10
minutes (8 of that is to get
pressure for the brakes)
6) the awesome hot/cold shower we
have with us all the time
7) the toilet!!! Specially at night!! (Or
parked in the middle of a city)
8) 500 liters of fresh water!!
9) in most african countries the rule
is, the one with the biggest vehicle
has right of way, we are good here
10) WE JUST LOVE OUR BABY!!!

If we could make the decision all over, would we choose the same vehicle??
Yes a big truck is the only vehicle we wanna be on the road for a long time.
If we had to choose a different mode of transport what would it be……… ??????? A motorbike for sure!!! It goes through everything!! It’s cheap on gas. You can sell it easily!!

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To ship or not to ship???

After spending two nights at the parking lot of the kendeja resort in Monrovia it was time to continue.
Our next place on our ittinarary was Kwapatee falls.
It was already pretty late by the time we got there because the road from Monrovia to the north is being rebuild and the detours are not always ‘Izzie friendly’
At the falls we were ‘welcomed’ by a few guys that told us it was 5$ entrance, we agreed and drove onto the eco “campsite”, one can not really say it’s a campsite because it has zero facilities but hey you’re still in africa!!
Than he started talking about the price for staying there the night and gave us the nice number: 125$!!!!!!!!
We just stayed at a five star resort for 20$ the 2 nights before!!
We decided to leave the place and first they didn’t want to open the gate because we still needed to pay the entrance fee!!! We were there for two minutes, didn’t see the falls at all!! So no, we were not going to pay.
This was actually the first time that Steven lost his temper and told the guys that if they didn’t open the gate he would drive straight through it and he ment it!!!
After a few minutes they let us out again, 30 minutes before it was starting to get dark and about an hour and 15 minutes drive to the main road again. So the question was where are we gonna sleep tonight. Didn’t see many spots before on our way there except a UN base, lets see if they can help us.
This base was occupied with soldiers from Bangladesh, very cool guys that couldn’t let us in because of protocol but said we could park accross the street and they will keep an eye on us. We had a lovely night and decided to get up early and drive to Nzerekore, Guinea, to meet up with overlanding west africa, finally!! (For those of you that think Nzerekore rings a bell, yep it’s where the ebola outbreak was)
It was a long drive, a border crossing, a typical bumpy guinea road, a moped taxi driver that hit us in the back but we made it in time to Nzerekore to meet Al and his group. Had a few beers together and shared some info.
It was nice to be with a group of overlanders again like we used to travel before, sometimes we really mis this!

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After saying goodbey to the group in the morning we decided to head to the border with Ivory Coast knowing our visa was only valid from the next day.
We knew from Al it was a friendly border were you can camp if necessary so worst case we had to spend the night there.

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When Steven went to immigration he soon found out that it wasn’t going to be a problem. At any african border it’s always the same, they write your name and passport details in their book ask your profession and where you going, this guy starts writing Stevens name and puts ‘Nouackchott’??!!? Steven looks again and sees he has the senegalese visa, that was issued in Nouakchott, in front of him and corrects him. Not sure if this guy can read so 24th or 25th probably doesn’t matter to him 🙂

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Al told us the road to Danane was pretty bad so we were expecting another Kenema Zimmi road but after all it wasn’t that bad and we even made it to Man that night.
We drove to the cascade hotel and asked to sleep in their parking lot, no problem, we could even fill up our water tank!!

The next day we drove up to Yamoussoukro, famous for it’s basilica. It is an impressive building but the cost to build it was 300 million dollars!!! In a west african ‘poor’ country!! It sure gives a sour taste to it.
The cool thing about Yamkro was that after 4 months in africa it was quiet, wide boulevards with hardly no cars and no people on them!!!
We treated ourself to a nice A/C room with high speed internet to download some tv shows and movies 🙂

Try and spot Sita in the pic below to get a feel on how big this place really is!

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After soukro it was time for Abidjan, a big metropole, not like you think a city in africa would look like. Altough the 4 lane highway from Yamkro to there, simular to the ones in europe, gave it away 🙂

In Abidjan we drove straight to a camping we found on the internet a few days earlier and guess who was camped when we entered….., yep Gary!!
Our main reason to be in Abidjan was to try and ship Izzie to southern africa. At this moment we kinda had it with the humidity, bad roads, corrupt police and just west africa in general!!
The thought of continuing through Cameroon in the rainy season and putting Izzie on the infamous Brazza-Kinshasa ferry didn’t make us change our minds, au contraire, we really don’t want to do this so shipping is the best solution.

We wrote tens of mails to diffirent shipping agents and got two mails back!! One was from Anil of DSS. He asked if it was possible to meet him the next day and so we did. But not after saying goodbye to Gary, this time for good. Or at least for a while.

The meeting with Anil was promising. They told us there was a RORO boat leaving Abidjan in one week going to Cape town.
He said he would try and find out what the landside shipping costs were for Abidjan and Cape Town and the shipping itself by monday or tuesday. (This was on a friday afternoon, boat leaving next friday)

We didn’t want to wait in grand bassam the whole weekend and decided to go to Assine.
Just when we were ready to drive east we got a message from a Chloe Grant (friend of Al (owa), the real Izzie, etc) if we wanna meet up for lunch?? Why not 😉
We had lunch with her and Maxi, found out about her NGO CREER and more important got a nice adress in Assouinda.
She rang JB, the owner, to ask if it was ok to camp at his place and we could. For free, even better!!
We stayed for two days.
The first evening just when JB brought out our food three guys walked up to us stating they are parked next to us with their landy and know us from Nouakchott , wow that’s a long time ago!! But yep we met these guys on our last day at menata.
We had two nice days with Jonas, Kai and Will.

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After the weekend we had to return to Abidjan to get the show on the road for the shipping and they needed to get going. They only got a transit visa for ghana and weren’t pleased with the idea that they only had two days to cross the country but hey it’s africa.
Anil didn’t have the news that we expected but gave us a schedule for a shipping from Tema to Walvisbay or Durban.
The dates 12th of april to 18th/23rd of april. PERFECT!! We can still go to Mali and Burkina which were high on our list but we were willing to give up if shipping from Abidjan was possible!!
Looking for flights from Accra to Walvisbay learnt us that it was actually cheaper and easier to fly home and surprise our moms than fly ‘direct’ to Namibia.

The next day we went to the malian embassy and got our visas within the hour, supereasy!!
Off to Bamako!!! In Bamako we had to get the Ghana visa, which is becoming a nightmare these days, and the Burkina one.
Burkina supereasy in one day, Ghana not so easy but we got it in three days.
Bamako is hot and dusty but has a few nice restaurants. We enjoyed our lazy days at the sleeping camel and the food, planned the rest of our stay in Mali and left the camel after six nice days.
Next stop, Djenne. We loved the mud mosque, a structure that was on our ‘to visit’ list for a long time, and it was all what we expected!!

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After one day in Djenne, let’s be honest there is not much else to do in Djenne, we left to go and explore Dogon country.

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At this moment the temps were always around 40-45 degrees and at night it didn’t cool off anymore so we decided to treat ourselves to a nice A/C room in a resort (which was empty because of the current situation in Mali). Afterall it was Sita’s birthday tomorrow and we really wanted to enjoy dogon so we rented a car, with A/C of course, and let us be chauffeured around 🙂

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For the first time since we left we were on a schedule, four more weeks till shipping and still a long way to Accra and a lot to explore, so we had to keep on moving.

We crossed the border into Burkina and went to Bobo.

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Spent a few days with Diana and Solo, a dutch couple, at foret diasso. Nice relaxed atmosphere. Good and cheap food. We can recommend this place to anyone going there.
From Bobo it’s easy to vist the Karfiguella falls, the domes of Fabedougou and Sindou peaks.
All three were absolutely gorgeous!!

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From Bobo we went to Ouagadougou.
We heard wonderfull stories about Ouaga’s restaurants and bars and were really looking forward to it!! After three days there we left but not after taking down half a tree at the catholic mission were we parked the last couples of days and paying a fine (read bribe) to a cop for speeding.

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It was time to get to Ghana!! Two weeks before shipping and still 1000 k’s through Ghana and a lot of beautiful beaches to visit.

We drove from Ouaga to Tamale, Kumasi and Accra in three long days. Every day we could feel that the hot but dry air was being replaced with slightly colder temps but high humidity again. One off the reasons that we are shipping!!

Our first stop was the most famous overland spot Big millies. A nice campsite with cold beers and cheap food but for us a little bit to noisy in the weekends!!

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After big millies we went to Ezile bay a very beautiful and quiet bay 200k’s west of Accra. We relaxed for a few days and start to return slowly to the capital.

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Next stop: stumble inn or as we call it little paradise!! Very, very, very nice and relaxed place with friendly staff.

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Walking distance from Elmina castle. It takes about 45 minutes along the beach. The first 30 minutes are really nice. The last 15 not so. In this area the people still shit on the beach and you have to find your way through the public toilet zone which is really not that nice.
The castle was worth a visit though!!

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After surviving a mini cyclone at the Stumble inn it was time to pack up and head for Accra again. After all we still needed to ship Izzie.
So we paid a visit to the shipping agent to finalize the details. He told us to bring Izzie on friday; it was monday, and they would do the rest. Sweet!

This meant an extra couple of days in Accra so back to Big Millies to get Izzie organized for shipping.

By friday we drove to the port and in good old african tradition the schedule had been changed, Izzie needed to go to a different place and when we got her there about three hours later we needed to get her to yet another place inside the port. Finally at about five in the evening everything was done and we handed over the keys and said our goodbyes.

It was now time to get ready to fly home for the surprise visit to our family and friends.

See you on the other side babe,
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Highway through hell to get to paradise

Guinea Bissau was a beautiful quiet country to drive through, the only downside, every police check they wanted to look in the truck!!! We always say ok but before Steven goes on the ladder he takes his flip flops off and say no shoes in the house, no combat boot wearing soldier, policeman or whatever will take his shoes of 🙂

Thank you Jupp and Doro for the tip!
For the roads in Guinea Bissau we had to pay 15000 CFA road tax and it was worth it. Almost all really nice tar roads!! Except the last part to the border with Guinea; that just turned into a riverbed.
In Bissau we stayed at the parking lot of a restaurant run by a German expat who’s lived there for the last 25 years.
Bissau has a really laid-back atmosphere and almost feels Caribbean; music playing everywhere, happy people and a very sleepy place.
The restaurant itself was surprisingly very good, we can only recommend restaurant Almagui in Bissau.IMG_4427
The border crossing Guinea Bissau to Guinea was one off the smoothest crossings so far!!
 No one there, just us, no one asking money, no simcard selling guys, no money changers, nothing.
Even the douane ‘demanded’ the carnet??? Usually you have to beg them to stamp the carnet!!
Off we were after about 30 min. On to Koundara to get some money and gas!! But no, no ATM so let’s get to Labe which is only 250 km further down the perfect tar road, boy if only we knew what a bad road this was!!
The first 80 km was perfect but than it started, one puthole after the other for like 120 km!! It took us 2 full days of bumping to reach Labe.DSC_3845DSC_3842
First things first: to the ATM, we need gas (our last top up was in Nouakchott Mauritania!) We soon found out that we only could get 300.000 guinea francs at one time which is 30€!!
Maybe good if you only need to buy a beer or some bread but not to gas up Izzie!!!!!!
So we got out as much money as possible and were able to gas up 275 liters. Enough to get us to Sierra Leone.
In Guinea we mostly camped in the wild which was beautiful but also very warm and specially in the south of Guinea very crowded, it’s true, you’re never alone in Africa!!!!DSC_3818DSC_3829DSC_3837IMG_4436
The Fouta Djalon region was very nice and less humid but quickly forgotten when we got to Conakry, the worst capital in the world.
Dirty, not friendly, not safe, corrupt police,…we felt we could only escape by checking in in a really nice five star hotel. After all it was our 100th day on the road!!
Off corse it was a total budget killer!!
The next day we got our visa so Sierra Leone here we come!!
Sierra Leone was one of the countries that was really high on the list and boy it really delivered!!
We were blown away by a lot of things: beautiful beaches, friendly people, stunning scenery.IMG_4452
Speaking of beautiful beaches, Bureh Beach in Kent, Freetown peninsular OMG!!
A little paradise on earth!
Pristine beaches, hardly anyone around during the week a real picture perfect.
We ended up spending a week a the bureh beach surf club where we met several other overlanders.
We met up with Gary the surfer again and met a lovely Chech couple Pavel and Lenka with their dog Fido.

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In those 8 days we drove to Freetown a few times to get our Liberian visa, gas up Izzie and get some good coffee, the best so far in West Africa!!
After those 8 relaxing days on that gorgeous beach, eating lobster, drinking a lot of cold savannah’s and beers we needed to get the show on the road again!! We left for Bo the next morning 😦
Big Mistake!
The road to Bo and Kenema is perfect tar again but then the horror starts!!!!
We thought that the Koundara -Labe road was bad, well this one was hell!! 120 km of hell!!
Putholes as deep as Izzie!!  20 hours of driving!! We could only dream of Bureh and cold savannah and keep on going towards Robertsport, Liberia.

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As things weren’t bad enough, we took one really deep putthole, the torsion between both cabins was to high and the living cabin separated from the chassis on one side and shook so violently that the fuel cap actually got dented, which means that the cabin must have been close to have fallen off.  we got stranded in the middle of the jungle with a half loose cabin, thank god we didn’t loose it!!
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After a first look it became quite clear that three bolts had broken off. After some roadside bush repairs we where able to push forward. Now it was even slower to Robertsport, where Steven could do a propper fix to it all!!
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The next two days were the most stressfull so far but we got to Robertsport only to find out that the place we were supposted to camp did have a big compound but with an arch above the entrance gate!! Luckely Daniel, one of the managers, didn’t mind getting the arch down so we could still park on their compound.
So a very big thanks to Daniel and JB from Kwepunha Liberian Surf Retreat for accomadating us and allowing us to fix Izzie.
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The next five days was all about fixing Izzie, doing testdrives, relaxing, eating, drinking Club beer and catching up with Gary!!! Again…

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We soon found out from all the expats and NGO’s at the surfclub that parking our monster in Monrovia would be hell so we decided to contact a nice resort in Monrovia asking them if it would be possible to park Izzie there and sleep in it since we didn’t have the budget for a room in exchange we can drink and eat in the restaurant.
Wich we are doing right now and plenty full.
We immidiatly got a mail back from the general manager that it was ok.
When we got there we met with him, an English guy that used to have a friend overlanding ‘a big truck’ but when he saw ours he realised that his mates ‘big’ landy is not a truck but a car 😀
He was so friendly, even invited us to free beers for happy hour!!
His motto: “it’s easy to say no, but saying yes is so much more interesting”
If only more people had the same attitude…
So again, a big thanks to Rod Peck of Kendeja resort and villa’s.
Today we are going to have a relaxing day by the pool, enjoy a few coctails and this evening a lobster meal with some fine vino!!!
Life is great!!
Some more images
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